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5 Ways Parents Can Help Prevent Teen Depression

Adolescence is not an easy time of life, but there are ways that parents can learn to make it less difficult. From modeling good behavior and congenial social skills to acting with kindness and compassion toward their teens, parents can go a long way in making this time of life more manageable.

“In one . . . → Read More: 5 Ways Parents Can Help Prevent Teen Depression

Folic Acid During Pregnancy May Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity

Experts have long advised women to take folic acid (a B vitamin) during pregnancy to prevent neural tube defects in their babies. A new study recently published in JAMA Pediatrics has found another possible benefit of this vitamin: sufficient intake of folic acid by mothers during pregnancy may reduce the risk of obesity in their . . . → Read More: Folic Acid During Pregnancy May Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity

Doctors Urge Schools To Start Later So Teens Can Sleep Longer

The American Medical Association is urging middle schools and high schools to start classes no earlier than 8:30 am so that teens can get the sleep they need for better health and concentration.

“The influential doctors group said nearly 10 percent of U.S. high schools today begin at or before 7:30 a.m. as districts . . . → Read More: Doctors Urge Schools To Start Later So Teens Can Sleep Longer

The Strong Evidence Against Spanking

Spanking is a fairly common, although controversial, form of punishment that parents use to control their child’s misbehavior. New research shows that spanking has a bad outcome for kids.

“Around the world, an average of 60 percent of children receive some kind of physical punishment, according to UNICEF. And the most common form is . . . → Read More: The Strong Evidence Against Spanking

Low on Sleep, Teenagers Behave in Risky Ways

Parents know how grumpy and distracted their teenagers can behave when they don’t get enough sleep. But a new study shows that lack of sleep can also put your teen at a greater risk of injury.

“Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control investigated the link between sleep duration and injury-risk related behaviors in . . . → Read More: Low on Sleep, Teenagers Behave in Risky Ways